Medicinal Herbal Recipes

Astringent Ointment

This astringent ointment is very useful at treating everything from Acne to hemorrhoids. Anywhere you have any type of skin erruption is the place you can use this ointment.

Astringent Ointment Recipe

  • 2 oz fresh Witch Hazel leaves (or 1 oz dried powdered leaves)
  • 2 oz fresh Plantain leaves (or 1 oz dried powdered leaves)
  • 8 oz oil (sweet almond, coconut, olive, or vegetable)
  • 2 tbsp Pure Lanolin
  • Pure beeswax to thicken to desired consistency.

Finely chop fresh herb, or grind dried herb in a mortar and pestle. Pour oil into a double boiler, or small crock pot. I would not recommend a pan directly over heat, as it would be very easy to burn the oil. Add chopped or powdered herbs to the oil, and simmer on lowest setting for a minimum of 4-6 hours. It is important to try to maintain an oil temperature of about 100 - 120 degrees Fahrenheit. Strain the oil through cheesecloth or a fine coffee filter. Retain a small amount of oil in a separate bowl, just in case your finished ointment is too thick. Melt the Lanolin into the main pot of oil. Stir until completely dissolved. Slowly add grated beeswax a little at a time to the main pot of oil, until the desired consistency is reached. I usually stir in 1 oz of wax until dissolved, then touch the back of a spoon into the oil, and let the spoon cool. I then check the consistency of the ointment, if it is too thin, add more wax, if too thick, add a little of the oil you retained in the beginning.

Pour the ointment into jars or tins, and store in the refrigerator until needed. As the ointment thickens, stir with a chopstick to ensure nothing settled out of the ointment. While this does not make for a very nice looking presentation, it ensures everything is properly suspended throughout the ointment. If you need a more uniform surface, you can gently heat the surface with a small torch to melt to a flat level surface. This ointment works great on blisters, cuts, scrapes, or just about any skin ailments. You can make a plantain ointment using 2 oz of plantain, and 1 cup of oil. Follow the same procedure, and thicken with beeswax. This is the best remedy I have yet to find for insect bites or stings.


Passive oil infusion method: Place herbs in a mason jar, and cover with oil. Cover the jar, and leave in a sunny location for two weeks. After the two weeks, follow the steps above to strain and thicken the ointment.

Comfrey Ointment

Testimonial

I stumbled onto your website a couple of months ago and read your page on the effects of comfrey healing ointment. My 2 1/2 yr old son has been suffering from eczema since he was 3 months old and over the last year, his hands and feet have been dry, cracking and bleeding. Nothing we've done have helped his skin heal until we tried your comfrey ointment recipe.

We were blown away with the results. We slathered it on like you suggested and wrapped his feet in socks every night for about a week. Amazingly, his feet and hands have healed and they have remained crack free for 3 weeks!!

Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge about herbal remedies and the advice (especially the personal account and photos) on your website are invaluable. Without it, we would have been none the wiser about these amazing herbs and my son would still be suffering in pain.

May God continue to bless you and your family and all you do.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year,
Emmeline G.

This ointment is wonderfully healing. I have never used anything remotely like it. I have a friend who is a Registered Nurse. She has said on more than one occasion how she wishes she could take it to the hospital with her, but that is not allowed. She received a patient from an extended care facility who had horrific bed sores. They would not respond to anything she applied. She was so upset that she could not take use wonderful ointment to ease that poor woman's suffering. The last thing the drug manufacturer's want is to lose their lucrative monopoly.

I would highly recommend making it for yourself, and keeping it handy. If your and your family are anything like me and mine, you will turn to it quite often.

The photos below show the results of using an ointment made from comfrey, plantain, and chickweed. I started by simmering comfrey, plantain, and chickweed in olive oil over a very low heat, for the better part of a day. I then thickened the oil with bees wax, and keep an enormous jar of it in the refrigerator. We use it on all manner of cuts, scrapes, and skin ailments.

Comfrey and Plantain both contain a compound called Allantoin, which is a natural cell regenerator. This stuff is amazing. I had a torn Achilles tendon, which the doctors said would have me down for about 6 - 8 weeks. I was up and walking without the aid of a brace or crutches in a week, and I was completely healed in 2-½ weeks.

I have a problem with dry cracking skin on the soles of my feet. they get so dry, and crack so badly that they begin to bleed. Unfortunately on December 23, 2010, I was trying to remove the dead skin, and made a mess of things. As you can see by the before picture, I had large raw, bleeding areas. I decided to treat it with my healing ointment, and see what happened. After a day and a half, the raw areas had skinned over, and had begun to heal in earnest.

I am sorry about the focus of a couple of the pictures. I should have paid more attention to the photography.

This photo was taken 12/23/2010 at 22:46

This photo was taken 12/23/2010 at 22:46

You can see, I applied the ointment liberally.

I then covered it with a band-aid. I changed the band-aid, and re-applied the ointment each morning and evening

This picture was taken 12/25/2010 at 21:23. That is approximately 46-½ hours of treatment.


Comfrey Ointment Recipe

  • 2 oz fresh Comfrey leaves (or 1 oz dried powdered leaves)
  • 2 oz fresh Plantain leaves (or 1 oz dried powdered leaves)
  • 2 oz fresh Chickweed leaves (or 1 oz dried powdered leaves)
  • 12 oz oil (sweet almond, coconut, olive, or vegetable)
  • 2 tbsp Pure Lanolin
  • Pure beeswax to thicken to desired consistency.

Finely chop fresh herb, or grind dried herb in a mortar and pestle. Pour oil into a double boiler, or small crock pot. I would not recommend a pan directly over heat, as it would be very easy to burn the oil. Add chopped or powdered herbs to the oil, and simmer on lowest setting for a minimum of 4-6 hours. It is important to try to maintain an oil temperature of about 100 - 120 degrees Fahrenheit. Strain the oil through cheesecloth or a fine coffee filter. Retain a small amount of oil in a separate bowl, just in case your finished ointment is too thick. Melt the Lanolin into the main pot of oil. Stir until completely dissolved. Slowly add grated beeswax a little at a time to the main pot of oil, until the desired consistency is reached. I usually stir in 1 oz of wax until dissolved, then touch the back of a spoon into the oil, and let the spoon cool. I then check the consistency of the ointment, if it is too thin, add more wax, if too thick, add a little of the oil you retained in the beginning.

Pour the ointment into jars or tins, and store in the refrigerator until needed. As the ointment thickens, stir with a chopstick to ensure nothing settled out of the ointment. While this does not make for a very nice looking presentation, it ensures everything is properly suspended throughout the ointment. If you need a more uniform surface, you can gently heat the surface with a small torch to melt to a flat level surface. This ointment works great on blisters, cuts, scrapes, or just about any skin ailments. You can make a plantain ointment using 2 oz of plantain, and 1 cup of oil. Follow the same procedure, and thicken with beeswax. This is the best remedy I have yet to find for insect bites or stings.


Passive oil infusion method: Place herbs in a mason jar, and cover with oil. Cover the jar, and leave in a sunny location for two weeks. After the two weeks, follow the steps above to strain and thicken the ointment.

Soothing Healing Plantain and Jewelweed Ointment

The following recipe is for a very soothing Jewelweed and Plantain ointment. It combines the soothing properties of Jewelweed with the healing and antiviral properties of Plantain. I carry a small jar of this ointment in one of the pockets of my cargo pants every single day. I cannot tell you how often I use it. It not only heals any skin abrasion or irritation, it also immediately alleviates any itching. I have found it to be highly effective when applied to the rash resulting from poison ivy and or poison oak contact. The luxurious feeling of the Lanolin, and the soothing nature of the Jewelweed also make it a wonderful daily moisturizer.
I would highly recommend making it for yourself, and keeping it handy. If your and your family are anything like me and mine, you will turn to it quite
often.

Soothing & Healing Plantain and Jewelweed Ointment Recipe

  • 3 oz fresh Plantain leaves (or 1-1/2 oz dried powdered leaves)
  • 3 oz fresh Jewelweed leaves
  • 12 oz oil (sweet almond, coconut, olive, or vegetable)
  • 2 tbsp Pure Lanolin
  • Pure beeswax to thicken to desired consistency
  • Pure Wintergreen and Lavender oils for their fragrant natures.
    (The methyl salicylate in the Wintergreen also acts as an analgesic.)
Finely chop fresh herbs; if using dried plantain, grind the dried herb in a mortar and pestle or spice grinder. Pour oil into a double boiler, or small crock pot. I would not recommend a pan directly over heat, as it would be very easy to burn the oil. Add the herb materials to the oil, and simmer on lowest setting for a minimum of 4-6 hours. It is important to try to maintain an oil temperature of about 100 - 120 degrees Fahrenheit. Strain the oil through cheesecloth, fine coffee filter, or chinois. Retain a small amount of oil in a separate bowl, just in case your finished ointment is too thick. Melt the Lanolin into the main pot of oil. Stir until completely dissolved. Slowly add grated beeswax a little at a time to the main pot of oil, until the desired consistency is reached. I usually stir in 1 - 2 oz of wax until dissolved, then touch the back of a spoon into the oil, and let the spoon cool. I then check the consistency of the ointment, if it is too thin, add more wax, if too thick, add a little of the oil you retained in the beginning. And finally stir in the desired amount of the Wintergreen and Lavender Oils.

Pour the ointment into a jar or tin, and store in the refrigerator until needed. This ointment is very effective for insect bites or stings, blisters, cuts, scrapes, or just about any skin ailments. I have yet to find a better remedy for insect bites or stings.


Passive oil infusion method: Place herbs in a mason jar, and cover with oil. Cover the jar, and leave in a sunny location for two weeks. After the two weeks, follow the steps above to strain and thicken the ointment.

Plantain Ointment

The photos below show the results of using an ointment made from Plantago major. I started by simmering fresh plantain leaves, which I picked from my yard, in olive oil over a very low heat, for the better part of a day. I then added Lanolin for a luxuriously soothing texture, and finally thickened the oil with bees wax. If kept refrigerated, this ointment will remain effective for quite a while. I use it on insect bites and stings, as well as all manner of cuts, scrapes, and skin ailments. The reason I use Plantago ointment rather than Comfrey ointment is because Comfrey heals much too fast. Now that statement may sound counter intuitive, but it makes sense when you think about it logically. Comfrey heals so quickly, that it heals from the outside in. This can be a bad thing if the would was not properly cleaned, in that it can seal impurities and infection into the cut. Plantago on the other hand also heals quickly, but it does so from the inside out, thus greatly reducing the chances of infection.

Plantago contains a compound called Allantoin, which is a natural cell regenerator. Plantago also contains the glycoside Aucubin. This compound is the plants natural defense against being eaten. You see if eaten, the Aucubin in Plantago prevents the cells of an herbivore from splitting and growing. Meaning they receive no nutritive value from eating this plant. While I cannot prove it, I believe this Aucubin is the reason why, for centuries, Plantago has been used as a natural antibiotic and antimicrobial. Viruses and bacteria often times have a relatively short life span; their virulence comes from their ability to replicate themselves quickly. If you can remove their ability to replicate you greatly reduce their virulence, and ultimately the length of an illness. Plantago has also been shown to be a superior antitoxin, and anti-venom. Many native Americans carried dried plantain as a remedy for snakebite. It is for these reasons that I turn to Plantago in either the fresh, or ointment form, whenever I have to treat an insect bite or sting.

This photo was taken immediately after my ex-wife was stung by a wasp. It had gotten into a pair of her sweat pants, and when she put them on, the insect attacked. Her body immediately reacted to the stings; notice the red and swollen areas.

This photo of the same area was taken less than an hour later. Notice that all of the swelling, and most of the redness is completely gone.

I would highly recommend making it for yourself, and keeping it handy. If your and your family are anything like me and mine, you will turn to it quite often.

Plantain Ointment Recipe

  • 4 oz fresh Plantain leaves (or 2 oz dried powdered leaves)
  • 1 cup oil (sweet almond, coconut, olive, or vegetable)
  • 2 tbsp Pure Lanolin
  • Pure beeswax to thicken to desired consistency.

Finely chop fresh herb, or grind dried herb in a mortar and pestle. Pour oil into a double boiler, or small crock pot. I would not recommend a pan directly over heat, as it would be very easy to burn the oil. Add chopped or powdered herbs to the oil, and simmer on lowest setting for a minimum of 4-6 hours. It is important to try to maintain an oil temperature of about 100 - 120 degrees Fahrenheit. Strain the oil through cheesecloth or a fine coffee filter. Retain a small amount of oil in a separate bowl, just in case your finished ointment is too thick. Melt the Lanolin into the main pot of oil. Stir until completely dissolved. Slowly add grated beeswax a little at a time to the main pot of oil, until the desired consistency is reached. I usually stir in 1 oz of wax until dissolved, then touch the back of a spoon into the oil, and let the spoon cool. I then check the consistency of the ointment, if it is too thin, add more wax, if too thick, add a little of the oil you retained in the beginning.

Pour the ointment into a jar or tin, and store in the refrigerator until needed. As the ointment thickens, stir with a chopstick to ensure nothing settled out of the ointment. While this does not make for a very nice looking presentation, it ensures everything is properly suspended throughout the ointment. If you need a more uniform surface, you can gently heat the surface with a small torch to melt to a flat level surface. This ointment is very effective for insect bites or stings, blisters, cuts, scrapes, or just about any skin ailments. I have yet to find a better remedy for insect bites or stings.

Passive oil infusion method: Place herbs in a mason jar, and cover with oil. Cover the jar, and leave in a sunny location for two weeks. After the two weeks, follow the steps above to strain and thicken the ointment.

Elderberrry Syrup

This is a wonderfully healthful syrup that is meant to be taken at the first sign of cold. If you take it after the cold has taken hold, it is too late. However, if you catch it at first symptoms, it will probably stop you from getting sick.

Recipe:

  • 1 c dried elderberries
  • 2 c water
  • 1 c tart cherry juice
  • 20 g licorice root
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper

Simmer 30 minutes, strain, and add honey/alcohol to preserve.

Dosage Directions:
At the first sign of symptoms, take 1/2 tsp every 15 minutes for the first hour, and then every hour until symptoms subside.

This recipe was developed by Rosalee De La Foret

Other Natural Remedies

Jewelweed Vinegar

  • 1 cup fresh crushed jewelweed
  • 2 cups apple cider vinegar

Place jewelweed in a glass quart jar. Cover with vinegar, and seal with a plastic lid. You can leave the herb set for about 4 weeks, strain and rebottle. Use as is or as a base carrier for antiseptic or insect-repellent essential oils, 10 drops to a one pint spray bottle. Vinegars will keep for about a year.

Antiseptic Insect Repellent Skin Oil

Oregano, thyme and tea tree oils are very strong and pungent oils, so we suggest a skin test first; if it burns when you apply it, dilute it further or don’t use it.

  • 1/2 cup almond, walnut or grapeseed oil
  • 6 drops oregano, thyme or tea tree oil
  • 4 drops each of up to four insect repellent oils (click here for a list of oils)

Add oil to a small clean bottle, preferably dark glass. Drop in the essential oils of your choice and shake well. Label and keep in a dark, cool place.

Insect Repellent Neat's-foot Oil

This is Tina’s recipe for applying to leather work boots, which conditions the boots and helps repel insects.

  • 1/2 teaspoon each orange, eucalyptus and citronella essential oils
  • 7.5-ounce bottle neat’s-foot oil (available in sporting goods stores)

Add the essential oils to the neat’s-foot oil bottle and shake well. Apply to boots as directed on bottle.

Gardener's Foot Powder

Keep your feet sweet while you work.

  • 1/4 cup cornstarch
  • 1/4 cup baking soda
  • 10 drops each lavender and tea tree oils

Put cornstarch and baking soda in a jar; add essential oils and stir.

Herbal Insect Repellent Vinegar

We pour our vinegars into spray bottles for easy application.

  • 2 cups fresh insect-repellent herbs (click here for Insect-Repellent Herbs)
  • 2 cups apple cider vinegar

Crush herbs with a mortar and pestle. Place herbs in a glass quart jar and cover with vinegar. Use a plastic lid to seal the jar (vinegar corrodes metal). Shake every day for 3 to 7 days. Filter vinegar within a week and use within the year.

Jewelweed Vinegar

Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis) grows in the wild, wet places in the eastern United States. The juice of the plant is a traditional remedy for all sorts of skin ailments. To use it, we simply crush the leaves and stems and rub the juice on itchy spots. To preserve and keep it handy, we make this vinegar.

  • 1 cup fresh crushed jewelweed
  • 2 cups apple cider vinegar

Place jewelweed in glass quart jar. Cover with vinegar and seal with a plastic lid. You can leave the herb in for up to four weeks. Pour vinegar through a cheesecloth-lined strainer. We add insect-repellent and antiseptic essential oils to the vinegar, 10 drops to a one-pint sprayer. You can mix with “Herbal Insect Repellent Vinegar.” Vinegars are good for about a year.

Antiseptic Essential Oils and Herbs

  • Calendula
  • Eucalyptus
  • Garlic
  • Goldenseal
  • Lavender
  • Lemongrass
  • Oregano
  • Patchouli
  • Rose geranium
  • Rosemary
  • Tea tree
  • Thyme
  • Vetiver
  • Yarrow

Astringent Herbs

An astringent herb dries tissue and reduces discharge and secretions. Most astringents contain tannins.
  • Comfrey
  • Plantain
  • Yarrow

Insect-Repellent Oils and Herbs

Dilute these oils in a carrier, such as vinegar, witch hazel or a skin nourishing oil (olive, almond, grapeseed, sesame or walnut) to deter mosquitoes, chiggers, gnats, ticks and biting flies.

  • East Indian lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus)
  • Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus)
  • Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia and L. intermedia)
  • Lemon thyme (Thymus citriodorus)
  • Mountain Mint (Pycnanthemum albescens)
  • Orange peel (Citrus sinensis)
  • Citronella (Cymbopogon nardus)
  • Patchouli (Pogostemon cablin)
  • Vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides)
  • Sandalwood (Santalum album)