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Eastern Purple Coneflower

(Echinacea purpurea)

Other Names:

Echinacea, Purple Coneflower

Range:

Family:

Asteraceae Aster family

Identifying characteristics:

Growth Type:

Herbaceous perennial.

Height:

Grows up to 3' high.

Leaves:

Leaves are lance shaped, stiff, and hairy. Flowers with prominent cone shaped disk surrounded by pale to deep purple spreading rays. Plant flowers in June through September. Rays are about as long as the width of the disk.

Stem/Trunk:

Erect Stems

Root:

Tap Root

Flower:

Season:

Plant flowers in June through September.

Appearance:

Flowers with prominent cone shaped disk surrounded by pale to deep purple spreading rays. Rays are about as long as the width of the disk.

Seed/Fruit:

N/A

Miscellaneous characteristics:

N/A

Habitat:

Dry open woods, prairies and barrens, as well as cultivated beds. Prefers loamy or sandy, well-drained soils. Unable to grow in the shade, E. purpurea thrives in either dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought, once established.

Parts Used:

Root, Whole Plant

Uses:

Wild Food Uses:

None Known

The following text is meant for informational purposes only. It is not meant to diagnose or treat any illness or injury. Always consult with a physician or other qualified medical care provider concerning the diagnosis and treatment of any illness or injury.

Medicinal Uses:

Roots chewed or in teas  used for treating snake bites, spider bites, cancers, toothaches, burns, hard to heal sores and wounds, colds and flue. Commonly used to treat the immune system. Echinacea has also been used to alleviate cold symptoms. It is has also been shown to have anti-depressant properties in white mice.

Medicinal Actions:

Alterative, Antibiotic, Antifungal, Antimicrobial, Antiseptic, Antiviral, Bactericidal, Immunostimulant, Lymphatic, Parasiticide, Tonic - Blood

This photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

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Revised: 10/06/14 Living Afield

 

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